jennyowenyoungs:

tonythaxton:

This is one of my favorite things I’ve ever done.  I hope you will check it out and share it.  Introducing, The Beachie Boys! From the latest episode of @FelizNavipod. 

America’s Sweetheart, Tony Thaxton, has broken my brain by combining two of the best things ever… so seamlessly.

dakotamcfadzean:

The secret dies with me.

(Source: blog.dakotamcfadzean.com)

bluehued:

"They are the earliest painted portraits that have survived; they were painted whilst the Gospels of the New Testament were being written. Why then do they strike us today as being so immediate? Why does their individuality feel like our own? Why is their look more contemporary than any look to be found in the rest of the two millennia of traditional European art which followed them? The Fayum portraits touch us, as if they had been painted last month. Why? This is the riddle.”
-John Berger, from “The Fayum Portraits”
bluehued:

"They are the earliest painted portraits that have survived; they were painted whilst the Gospels of the New Testament were being written. Why then do they strike us today as being so immediate? Why does their individuality feel like our own? Why is their look more contemporary than any look to be found in the rest of the two millennia of traditional European art which followed them? The Fayum portraits touch us, as if they had been painted last month. Why? This is the riddle.”
-John Berger, from “The Fayum Portraits”
bluehued:

"They are the earliest painted portraits that have survived; they were painted whilst the Gospels of the New Testament were being written. Why then do they strike us today as being so immediate? Why does their individuality feel like our own? Why is their look more contemporary than any look to be found in the rest of the two millennia of traditional European art which followed them? The Fayum portraits touch us, as if they had been painted last month. Why? This is the riddle.”
-John Berger, from “The Fayum Portraits”
bluehued:

"They are the earliest painted portraits that have survived; they were painted whilst the Gospels of the New Testament were being written. Why then do they strike us today as being so immediate? Why does their individuality feel like our own? Why is their look more contemporary than any look to be found in the rest of the two millennia of traditional European art which followed them? The Fayum portraits touch us, as if they had been painted last month. Why? This is the riddle.”
-John Berger, from “The Fayum Portraits”
bluehued:

"They are the earliest painted portraits that have survived; they were painted whilst the Gospels of the New Testament were being written. Why then do they strike us today as being so immediate? Why does their individuality feel like our own? Why is their look more contemporary than any look to be found in the rest of the two millennia of traditional European art which followed them? The Fayum portraits touch us, as if they had been painted last month. Why? This is the riddle.”
-John Berger, from “The Fayum Portraits”
bluehued:

"They are the earliest painted portraits that have survived; they were painted whilst the Gospels of the New Testament were being written. Why then do they strike us today as being so immediate? Why does their individuality feel like our own? Why is their look more contemporary than any look to be found in the rest of the two millennia of traditional European art which followed them? The Fayum portraits touch us, as if they had been painted last month. Why? This is the riddle.”
-John Berger, from “The Fayum Portraits”
bluehued:

"They are the earliest painted portraits that have survived; they were painted whilst the Gospels of the New Testament were being written. Why then do they strike us today as being so immediate? Why does their individuality feel like our own? Why is their look more contemporary than any look to be found in the rest of the two millennia of traditional European art which followed them? The Fayum portraits touch us, as if they had been painted last month. Why? This is the riddle.”
-John Berger, from “The Fayum Portraits”
bluehued:

"They are the earliest painted portraits that have survived; they were painted whilst the Gospels of the New Testament were being written. Why then do they strike us today as being so immediate? Why does their individuality feel like our own? Why is their look more contemporary than any look to be found in the rest of the two millennia of traditional European art which followed them? The Fayum portraits touch us, as if they had been painted last month. Why? This is the riddle.”
-John Berger, from “The Fayum Portraits”
bluehued:

"They are the earliest painted portraits that have survived; they were painted whilst the Gospels of the New Testament were being written. Why then do they strike us today as being so immediate? Why does their individuality feel like our own? Why is their look more contemporary than any look to be found in the rest of the two millennia of traditional European art which followed them? The Fayum portraits touch us, as if they had been painted last month. Why? This is the riddle.”
-John Berger, from “The Fayum Portraits”

bluehued:

"They are the earliest painted portraits that have survived; they were painted whilst the Gospels of the New Testament were being written. Why then do they strike us today as being so immediate? Why does their individuality feel like our own? Why is their look more contemporary than any look to be found in the rest of the two millennia of traditional European art which followed them? The Fayum portraits touch us, as if they had been painted last month. Why? This is the riddle.”

-John Berger, from “The Fayum Portraits”

softerworld:

A Softer World: 1056

(I just fell off the turnip truck, and landed on my feet!)

buy this print

pickyourheartupoffthefloor:

seekingthesky:

catsbeaversandducks:

10 Song Lyrics Significantly Improved By Cats

Illustrations by ©Kitties & Bullshit - and more here: BuzzFeed

this is my favorite post ever

this is one of the best things i have ever seen omg

damnthatswhack:

juicemanju:

Haha

I’m so very glad they didn’t illustrate the last one

(Source: pleasestopbeingsad)


One of the often overlooked but exceptionally easy to wear pieces in any man’s wardrobe is the cardigan sweater. When lightweight enough, it’s easy to wear layered under a jacket, but can also be implemented as a stand-alone item. Though a solid navy or gray is the classic option, sometimes it’s nice to mix it up with a unique pattern such as the cashmere one from Ballantyne pictured above. Manufactured entirely in Italy, it boasts a contrast placket with mother of pearl buttons, and we’ve paired it with a wool bow tie, check shirt, brown suede belt and burgundy brushed cotton chinos.

One of the often overlooked but exceptionally easy to wear pieces in any man’s wardrobe is the cardigan sweater. When lightweight enough, it’s easy to wear layered under a jacket, but can also be implemented as a stand-alone item. Though a solid navy or gray is the classic option, sometimes it’s nice to mix it up with a unique pattern such as the cashmere one from Ballantyne pictured above. Manufactured entirely in Italy, it boasts a contrast placket with mother of pearl buttons, and we’ve paired it with a wool bow tie, check shirt, brown suede belt and burgundy brushed cotton chinos.

One of the often overlooked but exceptionally easy to wear pieces in any man’s wardrobe is the cardigan sweater. When lightweight enough, it’s easy to wear layered under a jacket, but can also be implemented as a stand-alone item. Though a solid navy or gray is the classic option, sometimes it’s nice to mix it up with a unique pattern such as the cashmere one from Ballantyne pictured above. Manufactured entirely in Italy, it boasts a contrast placket with mother of pearl buttons, and we’ve paired it with a wool bow tie, check shirt, brown suede belt and burgundy brushed cotton chinos.

One of the often overlooked but exceptionally easy to wear pieces in any man’s wardrobe is the cardigan sweater. When lightweight enough, it’s easy to wear layered under a jacket, but can also be implemented as a stand-alone item. Though a solid navy or gray is the classic option, sometimes it’s nice to mix it up with a unique pattern such as the cashmere one from Ballantyne pictured above. Manufactured entirely in Italy, it boasts a contrast placket with mother of pearl buttons, and we’ve paired it with a wool bow tie, check shirt, brown suede belt and burgundy brushed cotton chinos.

(Source: khakiscarmel)

(Source: clintisiceman)

"Sometimes you meet someone, and it’s so clear that the two of you, on some level belong together. As lovers, or as friends, or as family, or as something entirely different. You just work, whether you understand one another or you’re in love or you’re partners in crime. You meet these people throughout your life, out of nowhere, under the strangest circumstances, and they help you feel alive. I don’t know if that makes me believe in coincidence, or fate, or sheer blind luck, but it definitely makes me believe in something."
— (via upoverthefields)

(Source: quozio.com)